A Life Poetic

Schrodinger’s racist: says potentially racist thing in possibly sarcastic voice. If the crowd is offended or laughs, it was a joke. If the crowd agrees, then it was genuine.

See also: Schrodinger’s misogynist

drthmaul:

neairaalenko:

There was a truly INCREDIBLE amount of shade being thrown about this on Facebook. That dude’s comment was only one of like 83462987. A small selection:

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Like a machine gun going off.

theflyingoliphant:

poems-and-lyrics:

- Carrie Rudzinski “Elbows”

Elbows by Carrie Rudzinski

He doesn’t remember what
he loved about me
so i hold him in my elbows
as if he needed someone to save him
and i hate that i’ve always believed in
things i couldn’t touch

tree house ladder i climbed you
with the weight you swung into me
told the sky
glow heartbeat
glow strong
glow window pane
hold me tight with your seatbelt arms
he speaks this her
this is fireplace
this is scarf eyes
this is the girl who took me from you

i am hammock swing
stardust cough
xylophone fingers
bruise easy rock swing
the meaning of yes
the language of whales

he doesn’t remember what we felt like together
he pauses like maybe i won’t see myself in his
bones i shift
and the city deserts me deep
and indigo sky knuckle down nosebleed
i resorted to creating new memories with you
by looking at old photographs
and pretending i had been in them

glove compartment hawk heart i pulled
sky captain kite punch like
you name me adventure
name me skip trunk keys scrape
name me stranger
like elevator kiss
like storm clouds
like hummingbird heartbeat

i said i like who i am as a person
and you pulled away
as if my skeleton wasn’t big enough to hold both of us
you wore apple core lips
like i should never be sad
that i spent all this time kissing someone who
didn’t want to be kissing me
as if i tasted like relief
like you wanted to cut me into you esophagus
and hush
like quiet city
like loves becoming a plea bargain
like spit me out as a watermelon seed
you say lets get married and name all of our children ribcage

i pull through him thumb locked
and aware of all the times he said apologizing would
just sound empty
and i whisper i hope if i’m getting old
it’s because you make time nonexistent
do not cantaloupe smile
do not flashlight heart
do not risk what you cannot promise on me
do not wear me like we are the same size
i’m building life with slice wounds on the bottom of me feet
deep enough to hide hopes in
so i can wear them into the ground
how to reach from my heart
so you don’t apple adam promises that
sound like
i never lied to you

i want you to teach me
to glow heartbeat
glow strong
glow windowpane
with blood in your
mouth like you thought climbing trees
could teach us to fight distance

remember to hold me
like you know how to shake
remember to keep everything at arms length
remember to palm scoop crayfish
remember to break me
like you know what you loved about me
these are my confessions on a street corner
bent shattered and proud

I promise to never use words like always 
refer to you and I in the future tense 
or reveal wishes before they come true 
because every boy I’ve ever loved 
has said I was the best thing 
that ever happened to him when they left me.

twentysplenty:

Pawel Kuczynski’s satirical art. 

YOUNG WIDE EYED ARTIST: The world is my oyster! What will I be when I grow up?
THE UNIVERSE: Disappointed.

Here are three elements we often see in town names:

If a town ends in “-by”, it was originally a farmstead or a small village where some of the Viking invaders settled. The first part of the name sometimes referred to the person who owned the farm - Grimsby was “Grim’s village”. Derby was “a village where deer were found”. The word “by” still means “town” in Danish.

If a town ends in “-ing”, it tells us about the people who lived there. Reading means “The people of Reada”, in other words “Reada’s family or tribe”. We don’t know who Reada was, but his name means “red one”, so he probably had red hair.

If a town ends in “-caster” or “-chester”, it was originally a Roman fort or town. The word comes from a Latin words “castra”, meaning a camp or fortification. The first part of the name is usually the name of the locality where the fort was built. So Lancaster, for example, is “the Roman fort on the River Lune”.

A Little Book of Language by David Crystal, page 173. (via linguaphilioist)

My brain assumes everything is a spider until clearly proven otherwise. And even then, it maintains a level of suspicion.